Changes coming to 911

tbendick

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this should be very interesting  guess intergraph will be one cad syxtem for everyone

now for admin is nypd taking control? maybe doitt or a new agency 

says we should know in a month
 

FD347

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Supposedly, PD's new Intergraph CADS is going live next month. Ours isn't going  to be ready until 2015.
 

CVILLE7111

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What is the Intergraph CADS?  Is this a different vendor/software, etc. ?  In terms of how FD units will be dispatched, does this mean significant changes?  Thanks!
 

raybrag

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Given the history of this boondoggle, I understand everyone's concern . . . but . . . maybe it'll involve something like a call tree for 911 calls, such as "911, if you are reporting a fire, press 1 now; if you need the police, press 2 now . . .etc." Now, if Johnny Phalsealarm (the caller) presses 1, he's connected to FDNY dispatch, bypassing the UTC operator.  Yeah, lots of problems, such as Johnny speaks only Slovenian, thinks the mugger who just stole his wallet is on fire, or many other problems, but maybe, just maybe it won't be a bad thing. (yeah, right)  ::) :p ::)
 

tbendick

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Intergraph is the current new vendor as of today.

If they truly go with one cad system for all it will be interesting to see response times.
Right now they don't count 911 interview times, only FDNY processing and response.

It might be a little harder to hide if its all one. Then you can see time from caller to 84. 
My bet is response times will jump.
 

811

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Firemen and EMS workers still have to be here, but the consolidation to Metrotech and PSAP shows there was no need to keep the borough Central Offices - dispatchers may be anywhere. 

Might be cheaper to outsource communications to India or somewhere.
 

68jk09

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Chicago's pathetic attempt to do more w/less .....shortchanging the law abiding complaintant ........ The Wall Street Journal

POLITICS
February 5, 2013, 7:36 p.m. ET

Chicago Dials Back on 911 Responses
Dispatchers Won't Send Police to Minor Incidents So They Can Work on Reducing Number of Homicides
By JACK NICAS

CHICAGO?Police here stopped physically responding to some 911 calls for non-life-threatening issues this week so officers can focus on stemming the city's rising homicide rate, a strategy that other big cities have implemented with sometimes controversial results.

Under the new policy, dispatchers will route 911 calls reporting non-criminal complaints or crimes in which no one is in imminent danger, such as some car thefts and simple assaults, to desk officers who will fill out police reports by phone. The new policy prohibits callers from insisting an officer be sent to the scene, as was allowed before.
The Chicago Police Department says it now expects to handle about 151,000 police reports by telephone this year, or about 30% of their total, roughly twice as many as last year. The department estimates the new approach will free the equivalent of 44 officers a day in a force of roughly 12,000 officers.

The move is the latest effort by Chicago police to combat the city's homicide rate. The city had 506 murders in 2012, the highest since 2008, and last month was the deadliest January since 2002. Late last week, Chicago Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy pulled 200 officers from administrative positions to teams focused on preventing gun violence and gang crimes.

"I'm less concerned about backing up the radio and more concerned with violence on the streets," Mr. McCarthy told city councilors last year when the 911 policy was being discussed. "We have to handle calls for service, but?I have to make policy decisions that are going to free those officers up to stop the violence," he said.

Michael Shields, president of the Chicago Fraternal Order of Police, said the shift in policy was minor and questioned the department's estimate of the impact. "I don't see where they're coming up with those figures," said Mr. Shields, who is fighting with the city over police staffing. "This is another example of trying to distract the public?when there really is no change."

Since the adoption of the 911 system in the 1970s and 1980s, many major cities have similarly shifted their 911 response from officers on patrol to those in an office, said former Newark, N.J., Police Capt. Jon Shane, now a criminal-justice professor at John Jay College. He said police in New York, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Detroit, Houston and Newark all respond to some portion of 911 calls simply by phone.

Milwaukee Police Chief Ed Flynn said his department and Chicago were now expanding the use of the telephone as the primary response for non-emergency 911 calls. For some types of 911 calls in Milwaukee, such as family disputes, most physical responses from police simply end with advice, Mr. Flynn said. The 911 system has driven law enforcement to a predicament "where police spend almost their entire time reacting to crimes rather than preventing them," he said.

When Mr. Flynn became chief in Milwaukee in 2008, he said he started directing the department's 150 light-duty officers?those restricted by medical issues?to handle non-emergency 911 calls. Last year, those officers took 37,000, or 14%, of the city's dispatched calls.

Some Chicago residents and local politicians are upset with the new 911 strategy. Chicago Alderman Scott Waguespack said he was already hearing from constituents worried the shift "will create more problems, like higher insurance and an open house for burglars." He said he hopes the strategy works, "but off the bat it looks pretty bad."

There are also some unseen consequences of handling more 911 calls by phone, such as an increase in fraudulent reporting and the potential to miss crime-scene evidence. Mr. Shane said that years ago, when Newark police began handling reports of cellphone thefts via phone, "we discovered people were running up extremely large cellphone bills, dodging the phone?and then taking the police report back to the company" in order to get out of paying the bill.

Chicago's police department said it would only handle 911 calls via phone if an officer determines that the victim is safe, that the offender is not on the scene or expected to return, and that an officer on the scene is not necessary for the immediate investigation.

Write to Jack Nicas at jack.nicas@wsj.com


 

68jk09

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811 said:
Firemen and EMS workers still have to be here, but the consolidation to Metrotech and PSAP shows there was no need to keep the borough Central Offices - dispatchers may be anywhere. 

Might be cheaper to outsource communications to India or somewhere.
....811 when you & the guys were in the Central Offices no matter how hectic it got you guys always made the right decisions ...you knew the Boro inside & out ...that may never happen again....a real shame & a crime for those left in NYC.....Thanks to those from years past in the Disp Force & Thanks to those today who against many odds try to do the "Right Thing".
 

FDNY150

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It's only getting worse, Chief. Doing the right thing gets you nowhere.
 

68jk09

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Unfortunately that may be true .....however we have to keep on "keepin on" cause that's what we do.
 

68jk09

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Mayor Bloomberg?s controversial $2 billion effort to modernize the 911 system ? billed as a cure-all for every emergency-communications ill ? was labeled a boondoggle by the city?s own experts two years ago, The Post has learned.

The project ?does not have a defined business case? for spending $2 billion on a new 911 system, Gartner Consulting told City Hall in a March 2011 report marked ?draft ? confidential.?

In bureaucratic-speak, Gartner was telling Hizzoner ?the program should not go forward? because the city hadn?t shown a legitimate need, as required by federal guidelines.

The consultant?s 45-page report, reviewed by The Post, explained the city was wasting its money by plowing ahead without resolving key problems. It slams the high-tech system for management failures and computer glitches, and clobbers key communications officials for refusing to cooperate and, instead, battling over turf.

The consultants report also found:

* Repeated failures of the emergency-response software were reported but were not fixed.

* The NYPD refused to merge its system for dispatching units with that of the FDNY and the EMS ? although that was a key reason for creating the new system. And the departments would not work together to create a unified management structure for the new system.

* The city agencies involved in the plan would not assist the system?s architects in setting up the new 911 network.

The document has not only been kept from the public but was also withheld from auditors from the City Comptroller?s Office, who spent more than a year analyzing the mammoth project.

?If the city withheld any documents from my office during the course of our audit into the 911 system, they violated the City Charter,? Comptroller John Liu told The Post. ?The Bloomberg administration should know by now that it can?t sweep its wasteful projects under the rug.?

The damning assessment of the Emergency Communications Transformation Program echoes much of what was laid out a year later in another document, the 911 Call Processing Review, or 911 CPR.

That report, kept secret for months until The Post revealed its findings, is now the subject of a major lawsuit between city fire unions and City Hall.

A highly edited version of 911 CPR was released in May in response to public pressure. Even the sanitized version of the report said the emergency-communications network was on life support because the technology didn?t work and the Police and Fire departments weren?t cooperating.

At the same time, fire officials started acknowledging that emergency-response times were actually on the rise ? instead of decreasing ? since the new system was installed.

Bloomberg spokesman John McCarthy said the city stands by its new emergency communications network.

?New York City failed to upgrade its 911 system for decades until the successful overhaul by this administration,? McCarthy said.

jmargolin@nypost.com



 

68jk09

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A dam shame that this pompous ass is not held accountable....the last sentence is a joke "NYC failed to upgrade the 911 system for decades & now it is successfully overhauled".....if it was not broke then do not fix it.....also he spent so much time farting w/the 311 system for idiots that do not know how to use a phone book ....or write a letter......this has turned into a monumental job bonanza for operators.
And still how many Fire Alarm boxes are out of service since the 2 tornadoes in Sept of 2010....the big joke (not that it is funny) is if a box is knocked over by a vehicle or snow plow then FDNY communications shows up & install a new post & box then gives it a fresh coat of red paint & attaches a fresh "out of service" sign since the circuit it is on does not work then miscreants walking by rip the sign off so once again the public has no idea that it does not work......God forbid that a person escapes from a late night house fire in pajamas & runs to one of these OOS boxes expecting to get help.
 

nfd2004

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68jk09 said:
A dam shame that this pompous ass is not held accountable....the last sentence is a joke "NYC failed to upgrade the 911 system for decades & now it is successfully overhauled".....if it was not broke then do not fix it.....also he spent so much time farting w/the 311 system for idiots that do not know how to use a phone book ....or write a letter......this has turned into a monumental job bonanza for operators.
And still how many Fire Alarm boxes are out of service since the 2 tornadoes in Sept of 2010....the big joke (not that it is funny) is if a box is knocked over by a vehicle or snow plow then FDNY communications shows up & install a new post & box then gives it a fresh coat of red paint & attaches a fresh "out of service" sign since the circuit it is on does not work then miscreants walking by rip the sign off so once again the public has no idea that it does not work......God forbid that a person escapes from a late night house fire in pajamas & runs to one of these OOS boxes expecting to get help.

  I just can't believe it. I don't know how somebody hasn't brought a lawsuit against the city over it.

  Chief JK, I'm sure the answer is that the city will just remove the box rather than fix it or the circuit.
 

68jk09

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The City (a few years ago) lost in court on their attempt to remove the remaining boxes .....the court ordered them to remain.....it is too bad they did not order the city to keep them operable.
 
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