Fire Departments That Don't Use Standard (NST) Hose Threads

Capttomo

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Sep 7, 2020
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As many of you know FDNY has always utilized its own hose coupling thread. Never made the switch to National Standard Thread (NFPA). I am told that Chicago also has its own thread. While out teaching various departments in the late 80's and early 90's I found out that Cleveland, Cincinatti, and Pittsburgh also utilized their own non national Standard threads. Don't know if Cleveland, Cincinatti, and Pittsburgh still use their own ? So what other departments have their own hose coupling threads that are not NFPA 1963 compliant?
 

Bulldog

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Apr 16, 2008
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I forget exactly what department said what about when I was in the fire service outside of Rochester New York we had to carry 3 sets of adapters so we could connect hose lines when responding mutual aid! It was a real cluster you know what! Never did understand why some departments were so insistent on having their own threads.
 

GeoC

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Jul 25, 2018
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267
Back on 9-11 I had just made it back to The Highway House when three rigs pulled up from
I think Elizabeth, LittleFerry and one other from New Jersey. But I may be wrong about their identity.
Who and how directed them there I don’t know but we were glad to see them. The first thing we did was to ask if they could hook up and supply water and to my surprise they had fittings for all hydrants and rigs. We put FDNY members with them and over manned the trucks until E 276 returned from WTC.
One company was redirected after we figured out the rig was too tall to go under the subway trestle on 16th Street.
I think it was Little Ferry NJ (?) who stayed for over two days without relief. I believe they were a Volunteer Company and should be acknowledged, belatedly for their dedication. The Brotherhood goes deep.
 

GeoC

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Jul 25, 2018
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267
Wow. Great post. I was unaware that many of these departments were still using proprietary couplings and fittings. Thanks for sharing
Thanks, next time I’m in NY I would like to go back to the Highway to check on those NJ Fire Departments that came to our help. We kept a record of their names etc and would like to somehow acknowledge them. I know they all wanted to go to the pile but their presence was much appreciated. At the time we weren’t thinking about much but the WTC.
 

GFD70

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Aug 11, 2012
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96
Many older cities had their own threads as they were developed before National Standard became a thing. I think after the Great Baltimore Fire was the turning point where the need to standardize was identified. In Westchester, there's National Standard, NY Corp and FDNY plus a few other odd balls. For example, Mount Vernon's hydrants have their own thread for the steamer outlets. I believe Rye does too.

Want to see firemen panic? Take 2-3 chauffer's, each from a different job who have never met before, and get them to try to hook a hydrant together. Each job will undoubtedly have a different name or color-coding system for their adaptors. What's the blue adaptor to one job will be yellow to the another and red to the third. The same can be said when trying to get everyone on the same radio frequency at a job. Your Channel 2 will be someone else's Channel 4.

I heard a story out of Yonkers where they were out on BI and took the time to test standpipe outlets in a high rise and found different threads on the outlets throughout the same staircase. Apparently, the multiple plumbers on the job never compared notes.
 

Capttomo

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Joined
Sep 7, 2020
Messages
743
Many older cities had their own threads as they were developed before National Standard became a thing. I think after the Great Baltimore Fire was the turning point where the need to standardize was identified. In Westchester, there's National Standard, NY Corp and FDNY plus a few other odd balls. For example, Mount Vernon's hydrants have their own thread for the steamer outlets. I believe Rye does too.

Want to see firemen panic? Take 2-3 chauffer's, each from a different job who have never met before, and get them to try to hook a hydrant together. Each job will undoubtedly have a different name or color-coding system for their adaptors. What's the blue adaptor to one job will be yellow to the another and red to the third. The same can be said when trying to get everyone on the same radio frequency at a job. Your Channel 2 will be someone else's Channel 4.

I heard a story out of Yonkers where they were out on BI and took the time to test standpipe outlets in a high rise and found different threads on the outlets throughout the same staircase. Apparently, the multiple plumbers on the job never compared notes.
 
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