A LOOK BACK.

mack

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There was another Tuite, Edward from Rescue 1that was killed in 1970, any relation? Anyone know?
Dan - Apparently no relation. FF Edward Tuite R1, was from SI. Father was John Tuite who died in 1951. His obituary does not list any FDNY relatives.

FF Edward J. Tuite, Rescue 1, LODD, Manhattan Box 583, 17 October 1970​


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On October 17, 1970, Firefighter Edward J. Tuite was the third Rescue 1 member to die in the line of duty. Firefighter Tuite was on the roof assisting in operations at 512 W.19th St., an old ice house, when he stepped on a boarded area that covered a shaft. Firefighter Tuite fell into the shaft and succumbed to his injuries.

tuite.gif

RIP. Never forget.
 
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mack

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NY Times 22 October, 1970

Delayed Alarm Cited In Ironworks Blaze Fatal to à Fireman​


Fire Commissioner Robert O. Lowery reported yesterday that an ironworker whose acetylene torch started the fire last Sat urday in which a fireman died tried to fight the fine for 20 minutes by hauling buckets of, water seven stories to the roof before the Fire Department was called.

The fireman, Edward J. Tuite, who plunged to his death when a roof board gave way at 512 West 19th Street, was buried yesterday following requiem mass at the Roman Catholic Church of the Epiph any. The mass was attended by Commissioner Lowery and 1, 000 members of the depart ment.

Commissioner Lowery said the Fire Department had is sued summonses to the Triboro Ironworks of 225 East 126th Street, and to the ironworker, Harry Olsen of 175 Bemant Avenue, Staten Island, for dis regarding basic Fire Depart ment safety regulations.

The delay in summoning the Fire Department, Commissioner Lowery said, did not directly cause the fireman's death, “but it gave the fire a vital 20 minutes or more to spread into the roof while the two work ers on the scene made no use of a telephone which was on the ground floor of the build ing.

The Fire Commissioner said: “I do not wish to belittle the frantic efforts which the work ers made to put out the fire, but their first step should have been to call the Fire Depart ment.

“I hope the public will take notice that delay in calling the department almost always cre ates a more serious situation, with greater hazard to the firemen who respond.”

Fire Commissioner Robert O. Lowery reported yesterday that an ironworker whose acetylene torch started the fire last Sa urday in which a fireman died tried to fight the fine for 20 minutes by hauling buckets of, water seven stories to the roof before the Fire Department was called.
The fireman, Edward J. Tuite, who plunged to his death when a roof board gave way at 512 West 19th Street, was buried yesterday following requiem mass at the Roman Catholic Church of the Epiphany. The mass was attended by Commissioner Lowery and 1, 000 members of the department.

Commissioner Lowery said the Fire Department had is sued summonses to the Triboro Ironworks of 225 East 126th Street, and to the ironworker, Harry Olsen of 175 Bemant Avenue, Staten Island, for dis regarding basic Fire Department safety regulations.

The delay in summoning the Fire Department, Commissioner Lowery said, did not directly cause the fireman's death, “but it gave the fire a vital 20 minutes or more to spread into the roof while the two work ers on the scene made no use of a telephone which was on the ground floor of the building.

The Fire Commissioner said: “I do not wish to belittle the frantic efforts which the work ers made to put out the fire, but their first step should have been to call the Fire Department.

“I hope the public will take notice that delay in calling the department almost always creates a more serious situation, with greater hazard to the firemen who respond.”
 

mack

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Tuite 4.jpg

FF Tuite, center, following March 8, 1970, special call to free impaled victim on fence spikes and then special called to assist surgeons at hospital.

WNYF 2nd Issue 1970
 
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In the above picture the LT on the right is Jim Leddy FF & LT R*1 & later he was one of my CPTs that I drove in 108....he later transferred to 306 then became part of the UFOA Executive Board until his Retirement ....he had related the impalement story to us .....R*1s part in the operating room was just as challenging as was the original impalement .....he told us that when they were called back to the Hospital the Drs told them to suit up in sterile gear & then said they had no idea how to get the imbedded tip of the one remaining spear out of the victims Hip Bone...after trying a few things R*1s solution as a last ditch effort was to use a pipe wrench on the end of the remaining cut off spear & turn it rounding out the hole in the bone allowing the spear to come out.
 
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If I remember this job correctly, the entrance to this building was on Daly Ave, right next to 45 quarters, with a shaft by the bunk room window. When this job came in 45 and 58 where out of quarters on a different run. The fire got into the shaft and cracked the windows of the bunk room. Companies stretched lines up the interior stairs and thru the office window on the front of the second floor to hit the fire thru windows in the firehouse and had a rig in the rear parking lot.
 
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Some of the data in this article is completely false and erroneous.

9FF90AC2-2BD2-4293-84C7-C257F65B6A02.jpeg

The Bronx lost 97 percent of its buildings??? WTF. Entire sections of the Bronx lost almost nothing during the 70’s Riverdale, Marble hill, Kingsbridge, Woodlawn, Wakefield, Bedford Park, Highbridge, University Heights, sound view, coop city, city island, Pelham Bay, Parkchester, van Nest…etc lost very little if anything of its housing stock. Yes there were small sections of the Bronx that were obliterated and has the majority of its housing stock destroyed. But to make a statement as outrageous as the Bronx lost 97 percent of its buildings completely destroys the credibility of the author.
 
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Some of the data in this article is completely false and erroneous.

View attachment 35222

The Bronx lost 97 percent of its buildings??? WTF. Entire sections of the Bronx lost almost nothing during the 70’s Riverdale, Marble hill, Kingsbridge, Woodlawn, Wakefield, Bedford Park, Highbridge, University Heights, sound view, coop city, city island, Pelham Bay, Parkchester, van Nest…etc lost very little if anything of its housing stock. Yes there were small sections of the Bronx that were obliterated and has the majority of its housing stock destroyed. But to make a statement as outrageous as the Bronx lost 97 percent of its buildings completely destroys the credibility of the author.
Perhaps certain census tracts lost 97% of their buildings, but certainly not the entire Bronx.
 
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