FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies

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mack

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ALL INFORMATION IN THIS TREAD ACCESSIBLE BUT NO NEW INFORMATION CAN BE ADDED - THREAD CONTINUES IN "FDNY AND NYC FIREHOUSES SECTION 2" WITH NEW INFORMATION, COMMENTS AND REPLYS.

Many NYC firehouses and berths served as quarters for FDNY, Brooklyn FD, Long Island City FD, fire patrols, police, airport, federal, military, commercial and volunteer departments and companies. The original sheds which housed the first fire companies formed to protect NYC in the late 1700s and early 1800s are gone. But many of the original firehouses built by the volunteer departments, FDNY, Brooklyn and LIC in the mid and late 1800s still exist - some operate as active firehouses, some serve community, business or housing purposes. Current FDNY firehouses include historic and new state-of-the-art fire stations. This thread is dedicated to the firehouses, their companies, their apparatus, their histories and the firefighters who served in them.

shed.jpgE_14_metamora_hose_29_fh.jpgWhitestone.jpgE_1_fh_aaa.jpgE_53_a_2.jpgE_204_fh_1.jpgE_71_fh_a.jpgE_217_1940s_a.pngE_216.jpgL_108_responding.jpgL_102_E_209_850_Bedford_Ave.jpg20141009_130927.jpgE_259_renovation.jpgR_2_New_FH.jpgMarine_6_Bravest.jpgNew_2.jpgR_2_fh_30.jpg


Directory - FDNY Firehouse and Company Look-Up - Firehouse Thread 1 and Thread 2 Locations - UPDATED FEB 2021

- compiled by fdhistorian

Company Page (Note - Pages "2-xx" are from 2nd Section Thread)


Engine 00153, 85, 2-08, 2-53, 2-151
Engine 0023, 26, 2-07
Engine 003103, 2-134 to 2-138
Engine 0045, 25, 88, 2-33
Engine 00543, 59, 2-08, 2-45, 2-93, 2-150
Engine 00672, 2-15
Engine 00724, 64, 85, 2-15, 2-108 to 2-112
Engine 0084, 24, 33, 88, 106, 2-05
Engine 0096, 2-31, 2-38, 2-151
Engine 0101, 4, 73, 2-2-8
Engine 01183, 2-04
Engine 01255, 93, 2-08
Engine 0133, 56, 69, 105, 2-51, 2-93, 2-150
Engine 01470, 2-33, 2-90 to 2-92-
Engine 01512, 14, 15, 24, 61, 2-15, 2-92, 2-134, 2-186 to 2-193
Engine 01626, 2-11, 2-31, 2-39, 2-93
Engine 01712, 13, 15, 24, 28, 29, 61, 2-15, 2-61, 2-134, 2-186 to 2-193
Engine 01822, 2-08, 2-32, 2-60, 2-93, 2-150
Engine 01950, 2-2-8
Engine 0203, 19, 105, 2-08
Engine 0216, 2-48, 2-180 to 2-183
Engine 0227, 22, 2-40
Engine 02378, 2-17
Engine 02418, 2-09, 2-41, 2-51, 2-150 to 2-151
Engine 0252-14,
Engine 02642, 43, 59, 2-32, 2-98
Engine 02791, 2-08, 2-11, 2-16, 2-93
Engine 02867, 83, 2-32, 2-67, 2-68, 2-93, 2-151
Engine 0296, 85, 2-09, 2-150 to 2-151
Engine 03023, 26, 2-08, 2-48, 2-150
Engine 03143, 63, 64, 63, 65, 2-14, 2-92-
Engine 03272, 2-15, 2-16, 2-81 to 2-82
Engine 0333, 7, 2-32, 2-61, 2-113 to 2-117, 2-122
Engine 0345, 42, 73, 2-98 to 2-101
Engine 03537, 2-12-
Engine 03636, 37, 107, 2-12, 2-92, 2-94, 2-151
Engine 03713, 2-33, 2-154 to 2-158
Engine 03873, 2-15, 2-68
Engine 0396, 11, 43, 57, 2-08, 2-32, 2-92, 2-154
Engine 0404, 25, 88, 109
Engine 04110, 59, 2-02, 2-08, 2-12, 2-28, 2-60, 2-66
Engine 04251, 2-28, 2-55
Engine 04359, 2-2-2-
Engine 04437, 2-33
Engine 04558, 66, 89, 106, 2-2-8
Engine 04643, 47, 58, 89, 106, 2-28, 2-33, 2-60, 2-93
Engine 04739, 43, 2-92, 2-130 to 2-131, 2-151
Engine 0482, 34, 35, 79, 2-11, 2-38, 2-59, 2-140 to 2-145
Engine 0495, 6, 57, 90, 109
Engine 05016, 2-37
Engine 0516, 2-25
Engine 0521, 2, 58, 89, 2-40, 2-60
Engine 05375, 2-92, 2-151
Engine 05479, 2-28, 2-92,
Engine 05529, 65, 2-08
Engine 05655, 2-75 to 2-76, 2-92-
Engine 0571, 2-25, 2-51
Engine 058109, 2-11, 2-28, 2-71 to 2-74
Engine 0592-27,
Engine 06098
Engine 0616, 73, 2-74 to 2-75
Engine 06259, 60, 105, 2-58
Engine 0637, 34, 58, 93, 2-61
Engine 06458, 89, 2-2-6
Engine 06533, 34, 2-11, 2-2-8
Engine 06629, 38, 42, 2-24, 2-125
Engine 06770, 2-12-1 to 2-12-2,
Engine 0682-11, 2-2-7
Engine 0697, 34, 48, 88, 93, 109, 2-32, 2-44
Engine 0707, 39, 73, 86, 2-90
Engine 07151, 88, 2-11, 2-185
Engine 07296, 2-60, 2-165 to 2-168
Engine 07311, 32, 47, 58, 59, 60, 89, 105, 2-11, 2-28
Engine 07455, 2-11, 2-30, 2-32, 2-92
Engine 07593, 104, 2-60, 2-151
Engine 0768, 24, 2-41, 2-151
Engine 0776, 2-05, 2-2-2-
Engine 0786, 7, 38, 2-2-5
Engine 07919, 2-51
Engine 080109, 2-33
Engine 08131
Engine 08211, 83, 93, 2-07, 2-39, 2-59, 2-168
Engine 0832-01, 2-02, 2-12
Engine 0842-03,
Engine 08511, 15, 105, 2-07, 2-11, 2-24, 2-28, 2-37, 2-151
Engine 0861, 2-2-3
Engine 0871, 2-2-4
Engine 08861, 89, 2-52, 2-60
Engine 08946, 73, 109
Engine 09047, 2-54
Engine 0916, 36, 2-43, 2-60
Engine 0922-08,
Engine 09357, 72
Engine 09410, 23, 2-28, 2-29,
Engine 09551, 2-11, 2-2-0
Engine 0962-21,
Engine 09735, 58, 73
Engine 1513, 73, 2-11, 2-41
Engine 15222, 73, 2-11, 2-46
Engine 15343, 2-06, 2-11, 2-46
Engine 15421, 92, 110, 2-35, 2-150
Engine 15522, 73, 2-27,
Engine 1561, 15, 59, 93, 2-11
Engine 1579, 73, 2-11, 2-50, 2-51
Engine 15820, 73
Engine 15921, 22, 73
Engine 16022, 61, 2-134
Engine 16194, 2-61
Engine 16240, 51, 73, 85, 101, 2-12-7 to 2-12-9
Engine 16373, 91
Engine 16427, 73
Engine 16519, 92-
Engine 16666, 67
Engine 16740, 41
Engine 1688, 21, 92, 2-36
Engine 20124, 2-36, 2-37, 2-61
Engine 2029, 60, 2-69 to 2-71, 2-150
Engine 2033, 10, 2-140 to 2-141
Engine 20455, 59, 2-38, 2-151
Engine 2052, 27, 30, 73, 2-34, 2-35, 2-168 to 2-173
Engine 20624, 99, 2-60, 2-134, 2-151
Engine 20725, 89, 90, 2-11, 2-146 to 2-150, 2-168
Engine 20841, 57, 2-302-52-
Engine 20914, 43, 44, 55, 88, 2-56
Engine 21010, 2-59
Engine 21125, 26, 2-34
Engine 21222, 100, 2-126, 2-151, 2-180
Engine 21311, 55, 60, 2-44, 2-12-6
Engine 2147, 19, 70, 2-19
Engine 21552, 100, 2-126, 2-180
Engine 21624, 55, 60, 2-29, 2-54, 2-102,
Engine 21744, 2-42, 2-60
Engine 21829, 44, 55, 59, 61, 2-16, 2-29, 2-60
Engine 21914, 18, 102, 103, 2-104 to 2-107
Engine 22058, 89, 105, 2-36, 2-161 to 2-165
Engine 2217, 73, 2-26
Engine 22243, 2-11, 2-32, 2-39
Engine 2236, 2-23
Engine 22428, 2-35, 2-168, 2-171
Engine 22539, 98, 2-45, 2-46
Engine 22641, 55, 59, 2-50, 2-61
Engine 22718, 68, 83, 93, 2-36, 2-94, 2-97 to 2-98
Engine 22859, 92, 2-12,
Engine 22961, 101, 2-124 to 2-126, 2-134, 2-150
Engine 23049, 50, 2-36, 2-39, 2-56
Engine 23130, 95, 2-16, 2-35, 2-152-
Engine 2324, 15, 23, 30, 56, 104, 2-16, 2-24, 2-37, 2-151 to 2-153
Engine 23370, 2-08
Engine 23424, 67, 68, 2-09, 2-10, 2-94 to 2-96
Engine 23567, 85, 2-39, 2-158 to 2-161
Engine 23667, 2-11, 2-28, 2-55, 2-56, 2-159
Engine 23710, 30, 67, 2-32, 2-153, 2-159
Engine 23810, 19, 67, 100, 2-151, 2-176 to 2-180
Engine 23967, 92, 2-11, 2-102 to 2-103
Engine 24010, 85, 2-06, 2-159
Engine 24140, 73, 2-11, 2-76 to 2-78
Engine 24272, 2-11
Engine 24352, 69, 85
Engine 24443, 53, 76, 2-10, 2-119 to 2-120, 2-123
Engine 2451, 10, 24, 32, 89, 90, 2-06, 2-10, 2-61, 2-118
Engine 24610, 45, 104, 2-38
Engine 24752, 2-58
Engine 2489, 24, 25, 54, 89, 2-35, 2-123
Engine 24929, 54, 86, 2-88 to 2-89, 2-159
Engine 25070, 73
Engine 2515, 8, 9, 25, 67, 68, 82, 2-34
Engine 25241
Engine 25314, 2-11, 2-82
Engine 2548, 32, 73
Engine 25547, 2-14
Engine 25697, 2-11, 2-150
Engine 25719
Engine 25859, 2-13
Engine 2592, 20, 86
Engine 2609, 16, 73, 2-79 to 2-81
Engine 26158, 102, 2-08, 2-10, 2-11, 2-42, 2-61, 2-150
Engine 262220,
Engine 2638, 2-08, 2-28, 2-29, 2-59, 2-61
Engine 2643, 15, 73, 2-11, 2-49
Engine 2655, 73, 2-150
Engine 2665, 8, 24, 2-06, 2-11
Engine 2678, 23, 2-06
Engine 26823, 91
Engine 26920,
Engine 2703, 61, 2-11
Engine 2719, 2-08, 2-47, 2-48
Engine 2722, 8, 31, 32, 91
Engine 2738, 2-19
Engine 2743, 5, 8, 73, 2-56, 2-57
Engine 27566, 73, 89, 98, 2-40, 2-151
Engine 27693
Engine 27757, 2-11, 2-28, 2-52, 2-53, 2-61, 2-140, 2-180
Engine 2782-19, 2-140
Engine 27972, 2-11
Engine 28023, 86, 106, 2-19, 2-20
Engine 28187
Engine 2822-26, 2-27, 2-61
Engine 28348, 72, 93, 95, 2-34, 2-35, 2-61
Engine 28453, 72-
Engine 28523, 2-11
Engine 28628, 2-107 to 2-108
Engine 2873, 27, 43, 46, 51, 83, 2-01
Engine 28814, 28, 43, 68, 2-12
Engine 2892, 13, 40, 2-49, 2-50
Engine 29011, 65, 2-11, 2-2-5
Engine 2912-14,
Engine 29227, 51, 83, 2-01, 2-11
Engine 29377, 2-06
Engine 29459, 2-11
Engine 29532, 83, 84, 91
Engine 2962, 8, 32, 74, 110
Engine 29773, 110
Engine 29866, 73, 89, 2-40, 2-41, 2-151
Engine 29966, 73, 89, 2-40, 2-151
Engine 30173, 2-19
Engine 30226, 73, 2-66, 2-67
Engine 30373, 2-17
Engine 30453, 73, 2-11, 2-12-
Engine 30538, 2-11
Engine 30628, 50, 66, 73
Engine 3072-2, 73, 2-38
Engine 30872, 73, 2-60
Engine 30970, 73, 77
Engine 31073, 2-132 to 2-134
Engine 31164, 73
Engine 31273, 102,
Engine 31345, 73, 2-45
Engine 31473
Engine 31573, 2-04, 2-173 to 2-176
Engine 31673, 93
Engine 31792, 2-140
Engine 31832, 73, 2-118 to 2-121
Engine 31932, 73, 91
Engine 32013, 71, 73
Engine 32128, 29, 73
Engine 32276
Engine 32339, 73
Engine 32439, 73
Engine 32569, 73, 2-29
Engine 3261, 10, 53, 59, 68, 89, 90, 2-10
Engine 32710, 45, 104, 2-11, 2-38
Engine 3283, 15, 73, 2-49, 2-61
Engine 32920, 21
Engine 33073
Engine 3317, 47, 94, 2-11
Engine 3327, 38, 39, 2-11, 2-45, 2-47
Engine 3332-11,
Ladder 00124, 64, 85, 2-108 to 2-112
Ladder 0024, 24, 88, 106, 2-05, 2-08, 2-14
Ladder 0033, 43, 58, 70, 73, 2-14, 2-45, 2-150
Ladder 00413, 93, 2-17, 2-2-8
Ladder 00518, 2-04, 2-14, 2-41, 2-51, 2-150 to 2-151
Ladder 0062-31,
Ladder 0072-14, 2-31, 2-93
Ladder 00823, 29, 74, 75, 2-08, 2-14, 2-48
Ladder 0097, 2-32, 2-113 to 2-117, 2-12-2
Ladder 0106, 24, 85, 2-08, 2-09, 2-14, 2-108
Ladder 01167, 2-14, 2-32, 2-67, 2-68
Ladder 0122, 103, 2-15, 2-134 to 2-138, 2-151
Ladder 0137, 22, 2-33, 2-40
Ladder 01437, 43, 2-12, 2-13, 2-92, 2-151
Ladder 0151, 4, 25, 73, 88, 107, 2-15, 2-33, 2-38
Ladder 0166, 11, 43, 57, 2-32, 2-92, 2-130, 2-151
Ladder 01743, 47, 98, 2-36, 2-93
Ladder 01812, 15, 16, 24, 29, 61, 2-37, 2-134, 2-186 to 2-193
Ladder 01916, 40, 2-27, 2-37, 2-60
Ladder 0203, 56, 2-08, 2-11, 2-29, 2-51
Ladder 0215, 42, 73, 2-98 to 2-101
Ladder 0228, 24, 2-41, 2-151
Ladder 023109, 2-33
Ladder 02453, 2-09
Ladder 02555, 2-30
Ladder 02679, 107, 109, 2-14, 2-28, 2-71 to 2-74
Ladder 02768, 89, 106, 2-14, 2-33, 2-38, 2-93
Ladder 0287, 2-32, 2-44
Ladder 0292-01, 2-02, 2-12
Ladder 0302-27,
Ladder 03111, 83, 2-07, 2-14, 2-39, 2-59, 2-168
Ladder 03216, 34, 35, 59, 2-37, 2-58
Ladder 033104, 2-60, 2-151
Ladder 0342-03,
Ladder 0354, 25, 88, 109, 2-04, 2-14
Ladder 03651, 2-20
Ladder 03719, 2-51
Ladder 03861, 89, 93, 2-52
Ladder 0397, 34, 48, 58, 70, 88, 93, 109, 2-04
Ladder 04013, 2-33, 2-151, 2-154 to 2-158
Ladder 04147, 2-54
Ladder 04211, 32, 47, 58, 60, 72, 89, 105
Ladder 0436, 36, 72, 75, 2-14, 2-43
Ladder 04472, 2-08, 2-55, 2-61
Ladder 04557, 70, 72, 2-12-1
Ladder 04631, 72
Ladder 04758, 72, 89, 2-26
Ladder 04810, 23, 72, 2-29
Ladder 04993, 2-27
Ladder 05046, 73, 2-02
Ladder 05173, 2-15, 2-68
Ladder 0521, 58, 89, 2-40
Ladder 0537, 39, 73
Ladder 0542-20, 2-21
Ladder 05535, 43, 51, 88, 2-185
Ladder 05635, 51, 2-55, 2-140 to 2-144
Ladder 05735, 82, 96
Ladder 05835, 58, 66, 82, 89, 106, 2-33, 2-93
Ladder 05915, 35, 39, 105, 2-11, 2-22, 2-37, 2-151
Ladder 06035, 82
Ladder 06135, 42
TCUs56, 64
TCU512
TCU51310, 23, 59, 2-29
TCU53139, 2-45, 2-46
TCU71211, 15, 105, 2-07, 2-11, 2-37, 2-151
TCU731
TCU73215, 56, 104, 2-37, 2-52, 2-151, 2-153
CFCs64
CFC1212-60,
CFC1312-60,
CFC15164, 2-60
Water Towers57, 61
WT163, 97, 2-108
WT23, 58, 70, 2-99, 2-165 to 2-166
WT342, 53, 2-98 to 2-99
WT479, 109
WT516, 26, 102, 2-34, 2-42
WT657, 63, 90, 97, 2-08, 2-30, 2-50, 2-52, 2-171
WT72-134
High Ladders39, 40, 2-40, 2-48, 2-140, 2-181, 2-187
BC0124, 85, 2-09, 2-15, 2-33, 2-66, 2-108 to 2-112
BC0218, 63, 65, 2-41, 2-47, 2-108
BC0310, 11, 23, 56, 2-07, 2-08, 2-11, 2-29, 2-48, 2-51, 2-64, 2-113, 2-134
BC0412, 15, 24, 29, 61, 2-15, 2-186 to 2-193
BC0522, 23, 56, 2-48, 2-49, 2-51, 2-113
BC066, 43, 70, 73, 2-16, 2-45, 2-131
BC0722, 26, 103, 2-07, 2-31, 2-51, 2-134 to 2-138, 2-158
BC084, 24, 33, 88, 106, 2-05, 2-31, 2-76
BC09228,
BC107, 10, 22, 2-15, 2-40, 2-47, 2-66
BC118, 13, 24, 90, 2-41, 2-47
BC1237, 107, 2-12, 2-58, 2-176
BC1357, 2-03, 2-15, 2-68
BC1498, 2-58, 2-113
BC157, 34, 58, 93, 2-58
BC167, 109, 2-02, 2-32, 2-44
BC1716, 51, 2-08, 2-37, 2-55, 2-108, 2-113
BC1855, 66, 106, 2-141
BC19104, 2-64, 2-151
BC206, 73, 2-62, 2-74 to 2-75, 2-165 to 2-166
BC2122, 2-06, 2-46, 2-47
BC229, 15, 73, 93, 2-50, 2-51, 2-78 to 2-79
BC2373, 101, 2-56, 2-12-7 to 2-12-9
BC2410, 2-44
BC256, 36, 75, 2-43, 2-64
BC2616, 32, 51, 2-37, 2-55
BC2710, 11, 19, 30, 2-07, 2-32, 2-51
BC289, 43, 2-32, 2-39, 2-47, 2-48
BC2937, 67, 2-45, 2-46, 2-47, 2-55
BC302-63,
BC3125, 89, 90, 2-47, 2-146 to 2-150
BC329, 59, 70, 2-30, 2-38, 2-51, 2-69, 2-70, 2-71, 2-79, 2-140
BC3393, 2-50, 2-56, 2-65
BC3414, 43, 44, 2-56
BC3524, 29, 32, 60, 2-29, 2-44, 2-102, 2-183
BC3610, 19, 100, 2-01, 2-55, 2-62-
BC3743, 61, 2-16, 2-32, 2-39, 2-51, 2-117
BC3824, 30, 68, 2-10, 2-15, 2-19, 2-94 to 2-96, 2-162
BC3930, 37, 67, 2-45, 2-46, 2-47, 2-55
BC4024, 52, 92, 2-19, 2-36, 2-58, 2-63
BC419, 24, 54, 2-35, 2-122, 2-123
BC4252, 53, 69, 85, 2-142
BC431, 10, 24, 90, 104, 2-10, 2-65
BC4430, 2-16, 2-35
BC4520, 86, 2-13
BC468, 39, 46, 51, 83, 2-01, 2-29, 2-39
BC475, 8, 23, 91, 92, 2-06, 2-08, 2-65, 2-157
BC4810, 58, 2-06, 2-58, 2-65, 2-102, 2-161
BC4973, 93, 102, 2-64
BC5066, 73, 89, 98, 2-40, 2-41, 2-47
BC5159, 72, 73
BC522, 8, 32, 73, 83, 2-19, 2-56, 2-57
BC5328, 53, 2-180
BC5473, 92, 2-112
BC557, 11, 32, 2-11, 2-64
BC562-33, 2-63
BC5767, 85, 2-93, 2-159
BC5819, 30, 73, 2-16, 2-103, 2-132
BC5932, 98, 2-64
BC602-16, 2-62
BC(Marine)2-43, 2-64
BC(HM)57
BC(Safety 1)57
BC(Safety 2)
BC(SOC)57
BC(FC)
BC(RAC)
BC(Rescue Liaison)
BC(Rescue Ops)
BC(Foam)
DC0118, 24, 63, 105, 2-41, 2-51, 2-108, 2-113, 2-165
DC0253, 55, 65, 96, 2-51, 2-64
DC0353, 55, 2-17
DC046, 36, 37, 75, 2-43
DC0537, 39, 109, 2-65
DC0651, 52, 2-37, 2-67
DC0735, 37, 52, 88, 89, 2-07, 2-140 to 2-144, 2-165 to 2-166
DC0821, 22, 41, 92, 95, 110, 2-35, 2-64, 2-78 to 2-79, 2-134
DC0942, 52, 2-54
DC1090, 92, 2-62, 2-102-
DC1125, 26, 60, 61, 89, 101, 2-34, 2-65, 2-124, 2-134, 2-146 to 2-150
DC1210, 70, 72, 73, 2-104
DC1341, 60, 61, 2-17, 2-138
DC1422, 39, 73, 2-38
DC1519, 41, 48, 70, 2-35, 2-178
DC162-53, 2-56
DC1741, 2-53
MarDiv2-51, 2-65
RS013, 22, 23, 25 26, 28, 29, 33, 42, 105, 2-07, 2-48, 2-98, 2-113
RS0210, 24, 67, 90, 103, 104, 2-10, 2-59, 2-12-3
RS0351, 57, 2-33, 2-93, 2-143
RS0427, 83, 93, 2-01, 2-20
RS0522, 2-27, 2-134
RS06
HazMat128, 43, 68, 2-12, 2-57
TSU156
TSU222,
Squads2-34,
S120, 66, 93, 2-27, 2-34, 2-59
S211, 16, 32, 105, 2-34
S349, 50, 67, 85, 2-34, 2-39, 2-59, 2-159
S430, 48, 95, 2-16, 2-34, 2-35
S512, 15, 24, 29, 61, 2-02, 2-15, 2-34, 2-38, 2-66, 2-134, 2-151, 2-186 to 2-193
S655, 2-92-
S755, 56, 100, 2-32, 2-34, 2-152- to 2-153
S855, 65, 105, 2-34, 2-35, 2-39
S92-34, 2-40
S182-34,
S21105, 2-34
S223, 2-34
S2410, 59, 2-34, 2-38
S412-34,
S612-34,
S2522-34,
S2702-34,
S2882-34,
Fireboats2-24,
Marine 11, 29, 2-25, 2-51
Marine 21, 2-23
Marine 31, 47, 94, 2-24
Marine 4
Marine 57, 38, 2-05, 2-25, 2-51
Marine 629, 38, 42, 2-05, 2-22
Marine 72-23,
Marine 84, 109, 2-24
M96, 2-25, 2-51
FB Devanney2-71,
FB Ronaldson2-71,
FB Kane2-148
FB Boody2-152- to 2-153
FB Hewitt2-152- to 2-153
FB Mitchell2-152- to 2-153
Boat Tender 1
Boat Tender 22-29,
Boat Tender 3
Boat Tender 4
Boat Tender 5
Boat Tender 6
Boat Tender 7
Boat Tender 8
Boat Tender 9
Hose Co's2-06,
Hose 11, 19, 45, 2-45
Hose 210, 59, 2-06
Hose 32-17,
Hose 43, 5, 26, 2-66
Hose 52-31,
Hose 666
Hose 721, 98
Hose 88, 32, 74, 110
Hose 98, 110
Relay Hose Wagon 1
Relay Hose Wagon 22-29,
Relay Hose Wagon 3
Relay Hose Wagon 4
Relay Hose Wagon 5
Foam Units2-61,
Foam 812-79 to 2-80
Ambulance 12-27, 2-75
Ambulance 219, 23, 45, 52, 2-19, 2-35, 2-58
Ambulance 323, 55, 89, 2-40, 2-41, 2-48
Ambulance 423, 2-48
RAC136, 75, 2-43
RAC243, 2-32, 2-39, 2-47
RAC3
RAC4
RAC572-
RAC6
Brush1/84/164/5047-Feb
Brush2/86/166/50666
Brush31, 93
Brush4/53021, 98, 110, 2-35, 2-37
Brush5
Brush629,
Brush72-06,
Brush835
Brush5619, 45
Brush962-21,
Brush82/162/50221, 67, 98, 101, 2-127
Brush16022,
CFR3171, 102, 2-30
PATH Airports10, 59
PATH Bridge&Tunnel41
PATH Laguardia Airport71
Bridge Chem 612-79 to 2-81
Bridge Chem 6271, 102-
Bridge Chem 632-01,
Bridge Chem 6483, 84
Chemical 1
Chemical 216
Chemical 366
Chemical 42-33,
Chemical 526, 2-28
Chemical 6
Chemical 770
Chemical 8
Chemical 92-2, 2-40
Disbanded Co's43, 44
EMS042-193
EMS1558
EMS172-27,
EMS238, 21, 98, 2-36
EMS2615, 105, 2-37
EMS277, 34, 48, 88, 93, 2-44
EMS402-19,
EMS4415, 70, 104, 2-38
EMS502-176
EMS5551, 88, 2-185
Foam 82/962-22,
Foam 842-37,
Foam 88/952-22,
FK2-176 to 2-177
Field Comm20, 79, 2-146 to 2-147
Field Comm 12-18,
Field Comm 22-20,
FDR12-32,
High Pressure2-14, 2-15, 2-17
Superpumper System26, 85, 2-26, 2-32, 2-34, 2-146 to 2-147, Sat2 2-165 to 2-166
MSU5, 90
SL1
SL2
SL3
SL42-14,
Salvages102
Model Cities Salvage2-21,
V122, 24, 2-10, 2-60
V236, 2-37, 2-43
V32-38, 2-141
V42-104
Fire Patrol 11, 19, 45
Fire Patrol 220, 2-12, 2-32, 2-53, 2-150
Fire Patrol 320, 2-53, 2-138, 2-151
Fire Patrol 42, 20
Fire Patrol 520, 2-08
Fire Patrol 61, 20
Fire Patrol 720, 2-08
Fire Patrol 820, 37
Fire Patrol 920,
Fire Patrol 1020,
HiRise 12-134
HiRise 2
Quads39, 74, 101
Squrts74, 2-24
TowerLadders103
Utility 1100, 2-60
HQ57
Shops42
SOC57, 90, 109
Supervising Engineers2-59,
Training Academy72
Suburban Co's2-12,
Tandem Double Co's80, 81
Tandem Firehouses78
Brooklyn CO88
Brooklyn Navy Yard8
Dr Archer2-05,
Governors Island2, 2-93
39 Worlds Fair2-11,
Lime Green Pumpers2-28.
Long Island City FD2-42,
Metropolitan FD2-44,
Edgewater Park97, 2-174
Oceanic H&L94
Richmond EC94
Great Kills VFD2-127,
8-8 Club2-21,
Fire Bell Club2-21,
WLF2-117
Constellation Fire2-150
Triangle Shirtwaist2-173
St George Hotel2-178
Brooklyn Theater2-178
365 Jay St HQ2-150
Scaling Ladders2-184 to 2-185
Index2-01,
 
Last edited:

mack

Administrator
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Messages
13,431
Engine 10-Ladder 15 - former firehouse - 73 Water Street  (1931-1962)

Dedication 1931:
E_10_Dedication_1931.png

Engine_10_Ladder_15.jpg

engine_10.jpg
Engine 10

l15_5.jpg
Ladder 15

E_10_5.png

E_10_R.png
Modernized quarters

E_10_today.png
Water St today


L_15.jpg


Engine 10/Ladder 10:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5XGCa42rPW0

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0SlX7lteESY


10 House Memorial LODDs:

    http://www.fdnytenhouse.com/911/

          Lieutenant Gregg A. Atlas Engine 10, Age 44  September 11, 2001

          Firefighter Paul Pansini Engine 10, Age 36  September 11, 2001

          Lieutenant Stephen G. Harrell Battalion 7, Age 44  September 11, 2001

          Firefighter Sean P. Tallon Ladder 10, Age 26  September 11, 2001

          Firefighter Jeffrey J. Olsen Engine 10, Age 31  September 11, 2001

          Captain (Ret.) James J. Corrigan Ladder 10, Age 60  September 11, 2001

          Firefighter Miles L. Sowarby  August 27, 1867

          Firefighter Thomas P. Eglinton  February 4, 1908

          Firefighter William F. Healy  June 6, 1910

    RIP.  Never forget.


Engine 10/L 10 web page:

          http://www.fdnytenhouse.com/

 
Joined
Aug 29, 2008
Messages
2,487
Directly behind 10 & 15's quarters is the 1st Precinct building which I believe still stands and is the NYPD museum. Did anyone notice the chain across the apparatus doors on the fire house? I wonder what that was for?


NOTE - CHAINS WERE IN PLACE TO KEEP HORSES IN FIREHOUSE WHEN DOORS WERE OPEN. ADDED BY MACK 3/4/19
 
Joined
May 6, 2010
Messages
15,808
Many FHs had the chain ...if you look at the sides of some doors you can see marks where it was fastened about waist high.........i had worked a few tours in Marine 2 when i was a LT......the whole bldg creaked & rocked....it was like a bldg on the water in the Orient. 
 

mack

Administrator
Joined
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Messages
13,431
Engine 245, Engine 245-2, Engine 326, Ladder 161, Bn 43  2929 W 8th St  Coney Island - former firehouse - (E 245 1904-1968/E 245-2 1904-1939/Eng 326 1939-1952/Ladder 161 1927-1968/Bn 43 1906-1968) - original Brooklyn Fire Department firehouse

2929 West 8th Street former firehouse:
Engine_245_0.png

E_245.png

engine245.jpg

E245_3.jpg

E_245.jpg

Eng_245.png


Current quarters (1971)
Engine_24_XX.png

Engine 245:
Eng245_n.gif

E_245_1946.jpg

E_245_app_1.jpg

Engine 245/Ladder 166 responding:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zfpVFGoyzBE

Engine 245/Ladder 166 building alarm:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FEOLC_Rkayk

Coney Island history:

1940s: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_LHjy8eZLVc

1952:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r9I31TcyacY


Coney Island fire history:

Engine 245 history:  http://www.nyfd.com/history/engine_245_1.html

        "ENGINE 245 AND CONEY ISLAND TOGETHER FOR 100 HUNDRED YEARS  By Mike Boucher S.I. CO


Coney Island is known for more than its' amusement parks, fine hotels, beaches, and hot dogs. During the turn of the century over 250,000 postcards would be mailed to every corner of the globe on any given weekend during the summer season. Because of these postcards, the area became a magnet for people. The area was densely packed with poorly built shanties, with narrow walkways between them. With the high density, cramped condition, Coney Island also attracted the seedier side of life with gambling, saloons and the ladies of the night. This all lead to what Coney Island is also famous for, conflagration on a grand scale.

Coney Island was first settled in the late 1600's by the Dutch. The name "Coney" comes from the Dutch word "Konijn" meaning wild rabbits. As early as 1824, Coney Island was a summer play area for the rich and famous visiting from New York City and Brooklyn. The growth of the area remained the same until the Civil War. After the War, five railroads were built from different parts of Brooklyn and Coney Island began to grow into a resort area and the most densely populated area in Brooklyn. This tightly and poorly built up area would contribute to some of the worst fires to visit New York City.

Coney Island was located in the town of Gravesend, which was annexed, along with the towns of New Utrecht, Flatbush, and Flatlands by the City of Brooklyn on May 3, 1894. This new land more than doubled the size of Brooklyn. When annexed, the fire protection would be provided by the volunteers in the area until the City's paid force could be expanded into the newly annexed area. All of the expenses to operate the volunteers would be paid for by the City of Brooklyn.

Fire protection on Coney Island was organized in late 1886 with two companies. Atlantic Hose 1, and Hook & Ladder 1 which were placed in service in a two story firehouse at 2919 W. 8th Street. Later in 1892, a second hose company was placed in service at Sheepshead Bay Road and W. 1st Street. In 1893, two different fires struck Coney Island with each burning a large section of the island.

The first fire was fought on the evening of January 6, 1893. The fire started in a drug store on the corner of Surf Avenue and W. 8th Street on a snowy, wind swept night. It burnt a bathing pavilion, the West End Hotel a well-known resort hotel, six stores, a 300 foot observation tower and many smaller building before it ran out of fuel. The fire was fought in a gale wind that blew the fire towards the ocean. The lost was set at $250,000.00. The West End Hotel was a two story wood frame building that measured 200 feet by 200 feet. In it was a bowling alley and billiard rooms in the basement, restaurants and saloons on the first floor and forty sleeping rooms upstairs.

The second fire of 1893 was on June 17th and was smaller but, took out a business block and the life of a fireman. The fire started in Frishman Bakery at 2:15 in the morning. A large pot of fat was spilled, setting fire to the woodwork. The fire spread along Surf Avenue between West 11th and 12th Street, burning out eleven buildings. The loss was set at $43,300.00 with very little of it being insured. Fireman John Madden, along with several other firemen were on the roof of the bakery when an explosion inside of the building, weakened the roof. Everybody ran to the edge of the roof for safety. Fireman Madden tripped and fell to the roof just has the roof collapsed. His body was recovered after the fire was put out. By dawn, the burned out basements were being filled in with sand and new construction began before the embers were cool. Most of the buildings would be ready for business in a weeks time.

After the second fire the political leaders of Coney Island ordered a new steam power fire engine that would replaced the hand power machines.The steam fire engine was ordered and arrivied late in 1893, Atlantic Engine 1 was placed in service and kept with the other machines on W. 8th Street.

On December 9, 1895, the Coney Island fire companies along with Gravesend Neck and Sheepshead Bay departments were replaced by paid companies. Engine 44 (244) & Ladder 16, Engine 45 (245), Engine 46 (246) & Ladder 17, and Engine 54 (254) of the Brooklyn Fire Department were placed in three volunteer houses. Engine 44 and Ladder 16 were located in a new house on W. 15th Street. All of these companies were under the command of District Chief 13 (now Battalion 43), located with Engine 45.

The first fire fought by Brooklyn's Engine 45 was on October 27, 1896. The Coney Island Elephant was built in 1876 and was the first of the famous attractions to burn. The elephant was seven stories high and over 100 feet long. Built of yellow pine and tin, it burnt to the ground in thirty minutes. The first floor had a restaurant and saloon, while the upper floors were used as a hotel. On the top was a howdad (the seat to ride the elephant), which was used as an observation deck, came crashing down in flames soon after the fire started. Also destroyed was Shaw's Toboggan Sled ride, which surrounded the elephant. The total lost was placed at $26,000.00. The elephant was seen in every photograph of Coney Island used in books during the "Gay 90's." It was never a moneymaker for the owners and it was sold several time in its short history. The elephant was located at Surf Avenue and about W. 5th Street. This location would have a repeat performance several years later.

On January 1, 1898, the Cities of New York with the Bronx, Brookyln, Long Island, parts of Queens County and Staten Island merged into the Greater City of New York. The Brooklyn Fire Department became part of the FDNY on January 28, 1898 with the companies being renumber on October 1, 1899.

Not a busy fire area in the beginning, Engine 145 responded to only thirty five runs in 1899 with only eleven working fires. One of these fires that year was fought on May 26th, the burning of nine blocks along the beach, from Jones Walk to Steeplechase Walk up to Bowery Street. This fire started around 2:40 in the morning after a watch man tried to put out a small fire. The fire spread from the original building before the first alarm was sent to the fire department. Engines 144, 145, Engine 144's ladder truck and Battalion 13 (now 43) arrived to find the end of Henderson Walk a roaring inferno. Because of the narrowness of Henderson Walk, the hoses had to stretched from the closest hydrant at Surf Avenue down to the fire, some 1500 feet away. Due to the poor construction and the closeness of the buildings the fire spread quickly to adjoining buildings. Once the fire was out a total of twenty six hotels were destroyed, along with 165 bath houses and many smaller buildings occupied by families. No insurance company would insure any of the buildings south of Bowery Street and the loss was estimated at $300,000.00. The four alarm fire was fought by ten engines, five ladder trucks and a fireboat.

The next "Big One" was on November 1, 1903. This fire was started over a woman and destroyed fourteen blocks. Three men were fighting with the owner of the Albatross Hotel over a woman, and they started a fire in the laundry room of the hotel. The fire started at Steeplechase Walk and Bowery Street, then extended to Surf Avenue over to Jones Walk down to the beach, back to Steeplechase Walk. A total of 264 buildings were destroyed for a lost of $1,200,000.00, and 500 were left homeless. A nine year girl was killed by the fire and thirty persons were injured. The three men were arrested for starting the fire. The four alarm fire and four special calls brought a total of sixteen engines and three ladder trucks to the location.
On July 29, 1907, fire visited Tilyou Steeplechase Park without paying admission. Built in 1897, by George C. Tilyou,

Steeplechase Park was the first of the well known amusement parks to open. The park was famous for the mechanical horse ride known as the Steeplechase. Other rides were the rolling drums that people tried to walk through, the Spinning Floor ride and through out the park were grates with air jets that blew air up as people walked over them. At the entrance was the wide smiling face of a clown, now used by Engine 245, Ladder 161, and Battalion 43 for their patch.

This fire was started under the stairs of the pavilion, probably by a discarded cigar. The night watch man found the fire around 3:45 in the morning and turned in the alarm. He pulled the master box for the Park but, did not turn the handle inside. The fire burned for twenty seven minutes before the alarm was finally turned in. The fire spread quickly to adjoining buildings. By Coney Island standards this fire was small, only seventy four building were burnt in a four block area, along with Steeplechase Park. Fireman Gottfried Messerli, of Engine 245 was hit in the head by a falling beam. He died on August 2nd has result of the injuries. The four alarm fire was under control in two hours and was fought by twelve engines and four ladder companies. Steeplechase Park would be rebuilt and it was closed in the 1960's.

Less than a year later, July 9, 1908, the Pabst Loop Hotel, the Vanderveer Hotel and the Culver depot of the Brooklyn Rapid Transit would be victims of the "Red Devil". The name of Pabst Loop Hotel came from the fact the hotel was curved and the BRT tracks looped around the building to change direction back to Brooklyn. The loss for these three building was set at $200,000.00. Located across the street from Dreamland, on Surf Avenue and W. 5th Street, the firemen had visions of the Island burning again. The new high pressure water system was ordered turn on and several hose lines, hooked to the hydrants were soon operating. The fire was held to these three buildings. The new high pressure system saved the Island from burning. With the new water system the big fires of the past appear to be a distant memory.

Dreamland open its doors in 1904 and cost $3.5 million to build. It was located on Surf Avenue between W. 10th and W. 5th Streets to the ocean. A 400 foot long iron pier stretched from the park out over the ocean. The park was laid out with wide walkways and sites, like the Canals of Venice, the waterfalls of Pompeii, and the Tower of Seville. Attractions included the Leap Frog Railway, the Fighting Flame Show, Chariot races and the Hellgate, a cross between the water rides of today and the Tunnel of Love ride. Dreamland also had one of the first "wild animal" park, though be it in cages. On the morning of opening day, May 27, 1911, Dreamland would change forever.

The fire started around 2 A.M., from an explosion of some light bulbs that were near a pail of tar in the Hellgate that was being repaired. Built of pine, paper mache and freshly painted for the new season, the fire spread very quickly. The high pressure water system was down for repairs. Instead of water pressure being 150 pounds, it was meager 25 pounds. The Tower of Seville, was 80 feet tall and could be seen over ten miles out to sea when the lights were turned on at night, burnt in thirty minutes. The fire spread through out the park trapping the wild animals. Some of the animals had escaped and were driven mad by the flames, were fighting each other before being consumed by the flames. One lion escaped into the streets with its' mane on fire, frightening everybody, including the firemen. The police cornered the frighten lion and pumped him with bullets to no avail. The lion charged the policemen and was hit in the head by an ax, that one of the policemen had borrowed. All of the animals were destroyed in the fire. The fire also spread to the 400 foot long iron pier used by excursion boats from Manhattan. It also had several restaurants and fishing areas on it. Nobody thought of notifying these people of the fire, trapping several fishermen and restaurant workers. They were rescued by a police boat.

By the time the fire was out a total of fourteen acres from W. 5th Street to W. 12th Street, were burnt and destroyed. The only thing to save Coney Island from completely being wiped out was the shift in the wind. It changed direction, blowing the fire toward the ocean and away from the buildings. The fire went to a fifth alarm and two Borough Calls, (a 3rd alarm assignment in another Borough that responded to this fire). As beautiful as Dreamland was it was never a profitable operation and was never rebuilt. The loss was estimated between $3,000,000.00 and $5,000,000.00. The land was turned over to the City and made into a park. Today, the New York Aquarium sits on the famous Dreamland site.

It would be twenty one years before the next big one would strike the Island. This "Big One" was not in the amusement area but, mostly a residential area that has not been visited by fire. Before the day was over, Wednesday, July 13, 1932, five blocks, would be wiped out. The fire was started by four boys doing their civic duty of cleaning up rubbish under the Boardwalk at W. 22nd Street. With no place to put the rubbish, they decided to burnt it. The rubbish was tinder dry and a forty mile an hour wind was blowing off of the water. The first alarm was transmitted from the box at Neptune Avenue and W. 21 Street, three block away at 3:14 P.M.. A minor fire and probably not visible, it was made a false alarm. The next alarm received was at 3:26 P.M., bring Engines 318, 244, 245, Ladders 166, 161, and Battalion 43 to the fire's location. The companies attack the fire that had spread to several concession stands by the time first company had arrived. Due to the high winds, the flames were jumping at will and setting buildings on fire behind the fire lines. The fire burned from W. 21st Street to W. 24th Street, along the Boardwalk, to Surf Avenue and to Railroad Avenue between W. 22nd and 23rd Streets.

A total of 178 building were destroyed. These included; seventy five, one story, eighteen, two story buildings, fifty six, three story buildings, four, four story buildings, one, six story apartment building, housing over 200 families, twenty four bath houses, and over 100 automobiles. The fire took a fifth alarm response pus two Borough calls and the recall of the off going shift at 6 P.M. to stay in the firehouses until the fire was under control at 12:32, the next morning. A total of forty three engines, twelve ladders, two rescues, one search light, two fireboats, one ambulance and two gasoline fuel trucks responded along with sixty men without apparatus. The fire left over 1000 homeless and over $5,000,000.00 in property damage. The one good thing coming out of this fire was that $400,000.00 would be used for a new high pressure water system.

The next great fire of Coney Island was at Luna Park on August 12, 1944. The Park opened in 1903 and cost $600,000.00 to build. The park contained 38 acres and was located on the north side of Surf Avenue between W. 8th & 12th Streets to Neptune Avenue. One of the main attractions when the park opened was the Trip to the Moon ride. In a dark room people would board spaceships and travel to the moon and outer space. The Park was decked out with over 1,000,000 light bulbs on every building. In the beginning a large crowd at Luna Park would be around 80,000 to 90,000 per day. The first year 4,800.000 people visited Luna Park, making it one of the most profitable of the amusement parks. By the time of the fire a good crowd would be under 20,000 per day.

The fire started in the washroom of the "Dragon Gorge" a roller-coaster that was made of wood and measured 60 feet high, 100 feet deep and, 90 feet wide in the front. As with all the other fires in the area, employees try to put out the blaze before calling the fire department. The delay in sending in the alarm by several minutes help to spread the blaze. Within 25 minutes of the first alarm at 3:45 P.M., five alarms were transmitted, bring twenty six engines and eight ladder companies to the fire. The high pressure system was boosted up to 175 pounds of pressure. After the fifth alarm a simultaneous call (a fifth alarm assignment) for Brooklyn Box 1227 (8th Ave. & Union St.) was transmitted for a total of sixty two companies operating.

During the height of the blaze, the 125 foot Coca Cola tower came crashing down missing several companies operating near the tower. Due to the flying embers, many places were in grave danger of burning also. On of these, was the Brooklyn Borough Gas Company gas tanks. Unfortunately several blocks away, twenty old wooden BMT railroad cars started to burn. This went to four alarms just to get enough equipment and men to handle this fire. The Park fire was under control after 5:00 P.M.. A total of twenty eight rides were destroyed, about half of Luna Park. Thirty five people were injured, and the lost was placed at $500,000.00.

The last of the big fires was on May 12, 1947. The fire started in rubbish behind 1228 Surf Avenue. This fire burnt through a dozen or so building between Surf Avenue to Bowery Street, and Henderson Walk to W. 12th Street. This area has been wiped out by fire on at least three other times. The fire was a fifth alarm assignment and injured forty five people, mostly firemen. Today, this area is just west of the Astroland amusement park.

Over the last one hundred years, there has been hundreds of other fires. The above stories are the biggest to visit Coney Island. Some of the other fires include, Steeplechase, again in 1939, Cox Baths, in the fall of 1939, Mardi Gras in 1940, and the Chamber of Commerce, just to name a few."


1911 Dreamland fire: 
Coney_Island_Fire.jpg

http://www.westland.net/coneyisland/articles/dreamlandfire.htm

http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/brooklyn/guest-restore-historic-roar-coney-island-recovered-1911-dreamland-fire-article-1.129112


1925: http://www.gendisasters.com/data1/ny/fires/coneyis-fire-apr1925.htm

1932:  178 residential buildings destroyed - started Boardwalk and W 22nd street

1944 Luna Park: destroyed Luna Park amusement area along boardwalk:
nnnnnnnnn.jpg

1947: 12 buildings destroyed on Surf Avenue

Engine 245 LODDs:

FF Gottfried Messerli - July 29, 1907 - Steeplechase Park fire - FF Messerli hit in the head by a falling beam. He died on August 2nd has result of the injuries.  RIP.

    E_245_LODD_Masserli.jpg


Captain Charles Furey - February 14, 1930  - "A veteran with thirty-nine years of service in the Department, died from suffocation while fighting a small blaze in an unoccupied candy stand at West 10th Street and the Boardwalk, Coney Island. Captain Furey, who was in command of Engine 245, collapsed in the midst of the smoke and was pronounced dead at Coney Island Hospital. The blaze was started in a pile of rubbish. The veteran fireman was promoted to Captain 29 years prior to his death and was Captain of Engine 245 since 1910. He was sixty-one, married and left behind seven children with two sons who were patrolmen in Brooklyn. (From "The Last Alarm" by Boucher, Urbanowicz & Melahn, 2007)"

    E_245_LODD_Furey.jpg


RIP.  Never forget.
 
 

mack

Administrator
Joined
Aug 8, 2009
Messages
13,431
Engine 245 original firehouse - 2919 W 8th St  Coney Island  (1895-1904)  Brooklyn Fire Dept Engine 45  - former volunteer firehouse
Original_245.jpg
Original volunteer quarters are left of former BFD firehouse built in 1904.

Atlantic Hose 1, and Atlantic Hook & Ladder 1 were established in 1886 in the two story firehouse at 2919 W. 8th Street.

Coney_Island_a.jpg

Coney_Island_vol.jpg
 

mack

Administrator
Joined
Aug 8, 2009
Messages
13,431
Combintion Engine Company 52/Eng 52/Ladder 52 - original firehouse  4550 Riverdale Avenue  Riverdale, Bronx

    CEC 52 organized 4550 Riverdale Avenue in former volunteer firehouse  1884
    CEC 52 became Engine 52                                                                  1928
    Engine 52 new firehouse at 4550 Riverdale Avenue w/Ladder 52            1939

    Ladder 52 organized 4550 Riverdale Avenue                                        1928
    Ladder 52 new firehouse 4550 Riverdale Avenue w/Engine 52                1939

Note - original firehouse at 4550 Riverdale Avenue quarters of volunteer company Neptune Engine 3

4550 Riverdale Avenue:
image.jpgriverdale_246_st.png


Former firehouse and current firehouse built 1939:
E_52.jpg

Engine 52's 1929 FWD hose wagon/Ladder 52's 75 ft Walters aerial
E_52_fh_1929_FWD_Hose_Wagon_and_75_ft_Walters_ae.jpg

Current quarters 4550 Riverdale Avenue:
E_52.png

52_1.png

Engine 52:
E_52.jpg

E_52_a.jpg

Ladder 52:
L_52.jpg

L_52_b.jpg

Engine 52/Ladder 52 responding:
E_52_L_52.jpg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPu6b_jTSYM


Riverdale: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Riverdale,_Bronx


88_big.jpg
 

mack

Administrator
Joined
Aug 8, 2009
Messages
13,431
Defender Hook & Ladder 7 firehouse 1721 Victory Blvd  Castleton Corners, Staten Island  Pre-FDNY

    Defender H&L 7 organized at 1721 Victory Blvd          1899
    Defender H&L 7 disbanded                                        1932   

Notes:  - Victory Blvd originally called Richmond Turnpike.
          - Nearest engine or hose company was 2 1/2 miles away
          - H&L company also purchased hose cart
          - Operated as ladder and hose company using hydrant pressure until engine arrived
          - Disbanded when FDNY Engine 163 and Ladder 83 were organized in 1932 in Westerleigh

Members in front of firehouse 1721 Victory Blvd:
Defender_H_L.jpg

1721 Victory Blvd firehouse:
Unknown_SI_7.jpg

Firehouse in 1916:
Castleton_Corners_1916.jpg

Today - bank parking lot:
Bank_Parking_Lot.png

 

mack

Administrator
Joined
Aug 8, 2009
Messages
13,431
Engine 87 (Marine) firehouse - Park Avenue and East 135th Street  Harlem, Manhattan

    Engine 87 (M) organized foot of E 132 St and Harlem River    1908
    Engine 87 (M) moved to foot of E 135th St and Harlem River  1922
    Engine 87 (M) moved to foot of Grand St and East River        1952
    Engine 87 (M) disbanded                                                    1955

1935:
Park_Ave.jpg

Fireboat James Duane Engine 87 (M) Fireboat Duane in service 1908-1959:
James_Duane_1908_1959.jpg

Duane.jpg

Duane_2.jpg

Engine 87 (M) Fireboat Duane crew:
Duane_Crew.jpg

Engine 87 (M) Fireboat Duane - retiring Captain Gorman ceremony:
Duane_3.jpg

Duane_5.jpg


Duane_4.jpg


Site today:

Today.png

 
Joined
Mar 8, 2007
Messages
5,392
mack said:
Unknown company firehouse - Park Avenue and East 135th Street - Library of Congress picture

1935:
  That was Engine 87 fireboat firehouse at 135th St. & Harlem River under N.Y. Central R.R. drawbridge before the East River Drive was constructed
 

mack

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Messages
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Engine 57 (Marine) Castle Garden berth (Eng 57 1981-1895)

Castle Garden - originally a fort built during War of 1812 at tip of Manhattan to protect city; became immigation center for NYC from 1820-1892 (11 million immigrants entered city here); replaced by Ellis Island as NYC immigrantion center.  http://www.castlegarden.org/

Castle_Island_Fire_Boat.png

Castle_Island_Fire_boat.jpg

Castle_Garden_Berth.jpg

image.jpg

Berth for The New Yorker: "THE NEW YORKER was constructed by Julius Jonson, New York, from plans by Charles H. Haswell. With a pumping capacity of 13,000 gpm, she was for many years the most powerful of fireboats. She was the first New York fireboat with a shore station and its house at the Battery became a land?mark as famous as the boat itself. When THE NEW YORKER was ready, Engine Co. 57 was organized and the boat placed in service on February 1, 1891. News articles of the day gave much space to descriptions of the boat and its architecturally distinctive sta?tion near Castle Garden. " - Marine 1 site
The New Yorker:
history_photo4.jpg

Today:
29castle2_650.jpg

 

mack

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Engine 156/Brush Fire Unit 3 - Firehouses - 412 Broadway  West Brighton, Staten Island  8th Division, 21st Battalion  "The Broadway Express"

    Engine 206 organized 412 Broadway in former firehouse of Wyandotte H&L 1  1905
    Engine 206 moved to 1189 Castleton Avenue at Ladder 104                            1907
    Engine 206 moved to 543 Cary Ave                                                              1907
    Engine 206 moved to new firehouse 412 Broadway                                        1909
    Engine 206 became Engine 156                                                                    1913
    Engine 156 moved to 1189 Castleton Avenue at Ladder 79                              2005
    Engine 156 returned to 412 Broadway                                                          2006

    Brush Fire Unit 3 organized 412 Broadway at Engine 156                                1997
    Brush Fire Unit 3 moved to 124 Liberty St at Engine 10                                  2001
    Brush Fire Unit 3 returned to 412 Broadway at Engine 156                            2001
    Brush Fire Unit 3 moved to 1189 Castleton Ave at Ladder 79                          2005
    Brush Fire Unit 3 returned to 412 Broadway at Engine 156                            2006                       


Pre-FDNY:

    Wyandotte H&L 1 responded from 412 Broadway firehouse  1892-1905:
       
          E_156.jpg
Volunteer company - Wyandotte H&L 1


543 Cary Ave Engine 206 (156) temporary firehouse 1907-1909:

   

      - used by E 206 (156) when original firehouse destroyed by fire

    - Engine 206 (156), the new FDNY company, was battling a 3-alarm fire when their firehouse burned.  Cause of firehouse fire was suspected to be either an overheated stove or disgruntled former volunteer firemen


412 Broadway current firehouse:

    E_156_a.png

    E_156.png


Engine 156:

    E_156_x.jpg

    E_156.png

    E_156_aaa.jpg


Brush Unit 3:

    E_156_BFU.png


Engine 156 LODDs:

    FIREFIGHTER JOHN B. DORAN ENGINE 156 June 25, 1914

          Died while responding to Box 383.  MPO Doran was driving Engine 156's new Nott engine when apparatus crashed due to malfunction at 1560 Castleton Avenue.  FF Doran was thrown from apparatus.

    FIREFIGHTER WILLIAM B. BROWN ENGINE 156 December 6, 1955

          Died from previous line of duty injuries sustained. 

    LIEUTENANT FRANK W. PECKERING ENGINE 156 April 3, 1963

          E_156_pickering.jpg

    FIREFIGHTER WILLIAM J. HANLON ENGINE 156 December 30, 1963

         

    FIREFIGHTER JAMES J. MAINE ENGINE 156 April 10, 1969

          Died from heart attack.

    RIP.  Never forget.


    West Brighton, SI neighborhood:  originally called "Factoryville"

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_New_Brighton,_Staten_Island



E_156_patch.png
 
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mack said:
This firehouse still active * - Engine 156 - 412 Broadway  Staten Island - built as volunteer firehouse 1892

1905 (approx)  volunteer company - "Wyandotte H&L S":

FDNY:

Today:


* Note - This picture is from NY Public Library from a post card of the era - noted as "the last call" of volunteer H&L company - firehouse is similar to current E 156 quarters.  There are differences (windows, brickwork).  This might be former firehouse on Broadway.
E156's present house was built in 1908 but there's a story as to why, according to the "Staten Island Fire Centennial" book: There was a 3-alarm fire at the Hotel Castleton on Nov. 12, 1907. In the early evening hours of Nov. 13th, while E206 (156 today) was still operating at the Hotel Castleton, a 3-alarm fire destroyed their quarters. The fire spread to adjoining structures on either side of the firehouse and to a dwelling behind the firehouse. Contemporary reports about the fire's origin are conflicting. Some indicated the fire started from an overheated stove while others report disgruntled former volunteer firemen sneaking into quarters and starting the fire. ::)
 

mack

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NYFP Fire Patrol 6  838 Cortlandt Ave Bronx (1901-1913)

    FP 6 organized at 838 Cortland Ave firehouse  1901
    FP 6 moved to new firehouse 278 E 156th St  1913
    FP 6 moved to 1079 Nelson Ave (former firehouse FDNY L 49)  1949
    FP 6 became FP 5  1955
    FP 5 disbanded  1955

FP 6 vacated 278 E 156 St firehouse for construction of high rise apartments

FP 6 838 Cortland Ave:
Fire_Patrol_8.jpg

FP_5_Cortland.jpg

278 E 156 St firehouse:
FP_5_New.jpg

FP_5_New_firehouse.jpg

FP 6 with white turnout coats:
FP_6_bb.jpg

FP 6 firehouse 1079 Nelson Ave 1949-1955/FP 5 firehouse 1955:
L_49.jpg
Ladder 49 - previous firehouse 1913-1947

Former firehouse 838 Cortland Ave:
FP_8_1.jpg
 
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