FDNY and NYC Firehouses and Fire Companies

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mack

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Engine 214 - original quarters - 231 Herkimer St from 1872-1948 - organized as paid Brooklyn Fire Department Engine 14 in 1872

231 Herkimer St firehouse:


http://www.brooklynpix.com/photoframex1.php?photo=/photo1/B/bedstuy301.jpg&key=BEDFORD STUYVESANT 301



E 214/L 111 current firehouse - 495 Hancock St (1957-present):


Companies' histories:
BFD Engine 14:
"The city has no more efficient factor in its excellent Fire Department than Engine Company No. 14, which was organized twenty years ago, and has since won a record most creditable to itself and the Department at large.  Its house is at No. 231  Herkimer Street, between New York and Brooklyn Avenues. The company covers a most important and extensive district ...  bounded by Ralph Avenue, Grand Avenue, Lafayette Avenue and the city line.  It is essentially a residence district, factories being few and far between.  And it diners from every other district in this respect, that it contains probably one-half of Brooklyn's public institutions, a condition of things which calls for the exercise of the greater vigilance on the part of the men attached to the company. Under the roofs of these institutions-asylums, homes, retreats and hospitals-from six thousand to eight  thousand persons are housed temporarily or permanently.  A large percentage of them are children, aged men, and women or invalids who would be helpless in case of a fire...Fires have occurred within this district that would have been marked by the most disastrous consequences but for the timely arrival and effective work of this engine-company. This is a matter of public record and one of which the gallant members of it feel proud. Engine Company No. 14 may be ranked as a veteran, as it has been in existence for over twenty years.  It was organized in 1872, or shortly after the old Volunteer Department passed out of existence. 

By a happy coincidence, it began its career on the nation's holiday, July 4th...At that time its district was much larger than it is at present, and the menhad to attend to every call coming from that part of the city which was bounded then by Flushing and Washington Avenues, the city line on the south and the New Lots line on the east.  It seems hardly possible that one fire engine company could cover so extensive an area and yet do it well, but No. 14 did it and did it with splendid results, as the fire records show. To-day No. 14 answers all alarms in the section bounded by Lafayette, Grand, an Ralph Avenues and the city line.  Second-alarms call it to points in some cases nearly a mile beyond these limits, except on the southern or city line.  Third-alarms call it much further, and special alarms bring it to the furthermost parts of the city.  The recent organization of Engine Company No. 31 in the Twenty-sixth Ward, has reduced the eastern end of No. 14's territory about one-half mile.  This change was absolutely necessary in view of the rapid increase in the number of buildings in the Twenty-fourth, Twenty-fifth and Twenty-sixth Wards.  Within a few years several hundred frame structures have been erected in the Twenty-fourth Ward alone.  During its extended career Engine No. 14 has attended hundreds of fires and has done effective work.  It has always been prompt in answering calls, and zealous in its efforts to save life and property, and citizens living within its bailiwick have always been loud in their praises of its work.  To the credit of this branch of the fire service it may truthfully be said that very few of the fires which have occurred within its territory were marked by loss of life.... The worst fire that ever occurred in this territory was the burning of St. John's Home for Boys, in which over 1000 children were being cared for.  It broke out late in the afternoon of Dec. 18, 1884.  The fire had gained twenty minutes' headway before No. 14 was summoned to it.  About 1000 of the inmates were gotten out in safety.  A Sister of Charity and fourteen boys lost their lives, however.  Nearly all of the latter were in the infirmary in the upper part of the building.  No. 14 and its gallant crew did splendid work at this disastrous fire and prevented a frightful holocaust."    from "Our Firemen -  the Official History of the Brooklyn Fire Depatment"


BFD Ladder 11 (became FDNY L 111):
"Hook and Ladder No. 11, went into active service at two o'clock in the afternoon of April 26, 1892. The home of the company is in a pretty two-story brick building, located on Halsey Street, near Sumner Avenue. Three fine, large, gray horses draw the latest improved Hayes' extension.ladder apparatus. The district covered by the company is bounded by De Kalb Avenue, Broadway, the city line, and Nostrand Avenue.  from "Our Firemen -  the Official History of the Brooklyn Fire Depatment"



Firehouse website:
http://www.fdnynuthouse.com/

http://nyfd.com/brooklyn_ladders/ladder_111.html




 

guitarman314

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E214 had to give up that Ahrens Fox when they moved to L111's old house on Halsey St. They swapped with E222 and wound up with a 1920's American LaFrance 700gpm rig.
 

JOR176

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Smallest FH I ever saw with two Co's.I remember going there in early 50's as my father worked for Con Ed and the Co Ed Doctor for the area was on Hancock St Tompkins to Throop circe 1953-54. I walked around to Halsey St to the FH  111 had a Bathtub American LaFrance Metal Aerial and 214 had a CD type Ward LaFrance that was their regular rig.
 

mack

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Engine 221 (originally organized as paid Brooklyn Fire Dept Engine 21)/Ladder 104 (originally organized as paid Brooklyn Fire Dept Ladder 4) firehouses

BFD  L 4 - 114 S 3rd St (1888-1913):

   

FDNY L 104 - 163 S 2nd St (1913-1931) - former quarters of E 221:

   

   

    http://nyfd.com/brooklyn_ladders/ladder_104.html


BFD Engine 21 (FDNY Engine 221) - former firehouse - 163 S 2nd St (1885-1913) - firehouse then became quarters of Ladder 104:

   

    http://nyfd.com/brooklyn_engines/engine_221/engine_21.html


E 221/L 104 - current quarters - 163 S 2nd St (1932-present):

   


Firefighter Paul Warhola - RIP. Never forget.

   


   



 

mack

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Engine 70/Ladder 53  City Island

Combined Engine Company 70 (1899-1928)/Engine 70 (1928-1938)/Ladder 53 (1928-1938) - 169 Schofield St

Original firehouse  169 Schofield St.




Current firehouse - 169 Schofield St - Engine 70/Engine 70-2/Ladder 53/Combine Fire Company 121 - built 1940:

(Under construction approx 1939)



Fight to keep firehouse open:
http://www.wpix.com/news/wpix-city-island-firehouse-rally,0,2932247.story
http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/bronx/city-island-residents-send-extra-fdny-company-memorial-day-article-1.125907



City Island history - http://www.cityisland.com/history.html

 

mack

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Engine 70's history includes periods as:

Combined Engine Company
Engine Company
2 Section Engine Company
Combined Fire Company

Any other engine companies have that many reorganizations?
 

mack

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Engine 78 (Marine)/Marine 5  - Quarters/berth foot of E 90th St Harlem River (E78 1930-1959/Marine 5 1959-1976)



 

mack

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Engine 78 (Marine) was located at foot of E 99 Street in Harlem River (Mike Boucher's dates).  It moved to 1930 to foot of E 90th Street.  The pictures should be the two different berths - but it is hard to tell on the second set.  Not a lot of pictures for Marine 5.
 

mack

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Castleton Fire Patrol - served in Staten Island late 1800s-early 1900s - firehouse on Castleton Ave and Taylor St - became site of Tompkins Department Store.




 

mack

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Young America Hose Company 2 - Flushing Fire Department - firehouse 34 Washington St, Flushing  1854-1908
 


Flushing Village was protected by several volunteer fire companies prior to becoming part of NYC.  Young America Hose Company had approximately 45 firemen.
 

mack

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Engine 22  - Yorkville - Established 1865 - original firehouse was quarters of volunteer Aurora Engine 45

History - pre-FDNY:
"No. 45. -- Yorkville. -- Aurora. -- This company was organized on September 11, 1826, by Milne Parker, Samuel Parker, Alexander Parker, the coach builders, Edward Prince, Edward Wells, and Jefferson Brown, Milne Parker becoming the first foreman. On May 21, 1827, the company were reinforced by the following members: John G. Kip, Joseph Tricker, Robert Kilpatrick, Stephen Huestis, James Bell, Stephen Harris, Augustus J. Flanagan, and others. Their first location was on the northwest corner of Eighty-fourth Street and Fourth Avenue, and when the tunnel cut through Fourth Avenue, about 1836, they moved up to the old frame house of No. 16 Engine Company, and placed it on the lot on the northwest corner Eighty-fifth Street and Third Avenue. A two-story brick house was afterwards built for them and Hook and Ladder No. 10, the company doing duty from a shed in Eighty-fifth Street. The house was afterwards made three stories high. About 1845 the company had their engine painted white and gold with a picture of Aurora, the goddess of day, on the back of the condenser case. Shew was then christened "Aurora," which name she retained. Philip Grimm, Eli Budd, Alonzo A. Alvord, Rufus Prime, Wm. Fulmer, Frank B. Ball, William Mead, and Frank Bazzoni were the different foremen of the company, Bazzoni serving as such from 1853 until 1865, the longest continuous service any foreman in the Old Department. Joseph McDonald, the colonel of the Forty-seventh New York Volunteers during the late war, was a runner with this company, and John Shelly, brother of Assemblyman Edward J. Shelly, was at one time an assistant foreman and a prominent candidate for assistant engineer. Went out of service in 1865." from "Our Firemen, The History of the NY Fire Departments"

Engine 22 original firehouse 1511 3rd Avenue 1865-1878 (Aurora Engine 45 quarters":


Firehouse at 159 E 85th St w/Bn 10  1878-1960:








Firehouse w/L 13 and Bn 10 at 159 E 85th St:

1960


Current picture

Battalion chief 10 + Engine 22 + Tower ladder 13 FDNY

 

mack

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Combination Engine Company 69/Ladder 39  - former firehouse - 243 E 233 St  Wakefield  Bronx    (CEC 69 1898-1916/L 39 1916-2006) - last wood-frame FDNY firehouse


Originally quarters of Combination Engine Company 69


Former quarters of Ladder 39

Ladder 39:






http://articles.nydailynews.com/2006-02-10/local/18330420_1_new-firehouse-fdny-engine

http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/bronx/fdny-response-angers-nabe-article-1.235709

http://www.nydailynews.com/archives/boroughs/line-nearing-bx-firehouse-article-1.618658

http://www.nyc.gov/html/fdny/html/events/2011/080511a.shtml

Current EMS Station 27 built at 243 E 233 St:


Current firehouse Engine 69/Ladder 28/Bn 16  Harlem:


Current firehouse Engine 63/Ladder 39/Bn 15  755 E 233 St  Wakefield  Bronx:

Top of da Bronx

http://www.fdnyengine63.com/news/index/layoutfile/home




 

mack

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mack

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Engine 33 note previous post:  3rd picture company sign above door reads "Metropolitan Engine 33".  It was then replaced with an "Engine 33" sign. 

Some history:
"In 1865 the volunteer fire department was abolished by a state act which was passed to create the Metropolitan Fire District and the Metropolitan Fire Department (MFD). This effectively gave control of the fire departments in the cities of New York and Brooklyn to the Governor who appointed its Board of Commissioners. There was never any effective incorporation of the fire departments of the two cities during this period. It wasn't until the Greater City of New York was consolidated in 1898 that the two were combined under one structure and leadership. The change met with a mixed reaction from the citizens, and some of the eliminated volunteers became bitter and resentful which resulted in both political battles and street fights. But the insurance companies in the city finally got their way by having the volunteers replaced with paid "professionals." The members of the paid fire department were mostly selected from the prior volunteers. All of the volunteer's apparatus, including their fire houses, were seized by the state who made use of them to form the new organization and form the basis of the FDNY as we know it today...The MFD lasted until 1870 when the Tweed Charter ended state control in the city. As a result, a new Board of Fire Commissioners was created and the original name of the Fire Department City of New York (FDNY) was re-instated."
(from Wikipedia)
 

mack

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1939 Worlds Fair    Engine 331/Engine 331 (2)  1938-1941 -  firehouse located Main St  World's Fair 
Engine 332 and Bn 55 were located at South Gate and Horace Harding Blvd

Originally the 1939 Worlds Fair was to have a private fire department.  It was actually protected by FDNY. 

Firehouse behind apparatus:


"In September 1938, the FDNY 55th Battalion was formed and stationed at the Fair to man the apparatus. It included three Battalion Chiefs, fourteen company officers, and seventy firemen manning one double and two single engine companies. In addition, sixty-five "Fire Guards" were organized under the direction of Chief Dougherty. The Fire Guard was a private force of retired FDNY members hired by the New York World's Fair Corporation. They operated in a fire prevention capacity, inspecting buildings and patrolling the grounds during the hours that the Fair was open to the public. The Battalion and the Fire Guard were disbanded in 1940 shortly after the close of the Fair. The apparatus was given to the FDNY.

For the only time in FDNY history, the emblem of a private entity was affixed to the uniform of firefighters. Men assigned to the companies stationed at the World's Fair worn the distinctive Trylon and Perisphere on the left arm of their dress blues."

http://www.1939nyworldsfair.com/worlds_fair/wf_tour/misc/NYFD_01.htm







Engine 331:


http://www.nyfd.com/calderoneA/foxes2.html


 

mack

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Additional 1939 Worlds Fair Fire Department Pictures:

Engine 332:


Badge:


Class A Uniform:


 

mack

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The 1939 Worlds fair Fair was protected by six fully-equipped and staffed first aid stations, five ambulances and a truck with a portable X-ray machine.





http://www.1939nyworldsfair.com/worlds_fair/wf_tour/misc/NYFD_03.htm

Bomb July 7, 1940 - WWII terrorist bomb explodes at Worlds Fair - 2 NYPD Detectives Killed:

"New York City detectives Joe Lynch and Freddy Socha were assigned to the Bomb and Forgery Squad just before the opening of the 1939 World's Fair. ... An electrician saw an unfamiliar overnight bag in the control room of the British Pavilion, heard ticking and brought it to his boss. Not knowing what to do, they took the bag and walked through the crowded building in search of the head of security, who was standing guard over the Magna Carta. He called the police and carried the bag outside.When Lynch and Socha arrived, following procedure, they cut open the bag. The resulting explosion killed them both instantly and injured many others."



http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2010-06-25/deadly-1939-world-s-fair-bomb-remains-unsolved-lewis-lapham.html

http://www.nypost.com/p/news/opinion/books/twilight_at_the_world_of_tomorrow_BlyxUmhe8HiwiZqg1YgDOM

http://www.nypdangels.com/cop/cop.php?id=344

RIP
 
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